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A year on for goal line technology: Has it Proven Successful?

September 01, 2015

- Grant Whittington

A year ago, the world football authorities were dragged kicking and screaming into the modern age with the implementation of live, goal-line technology. The purpose of this was simple: to make more accurate decisions during games and judge whether or not the ball had crossed the line during a particular attack.

With goal-line technology a key feature of international and domestic football, there is talk that authorities are keen to take this to the next level. This means that we could soon see video technology being issues to review numerous contentious moments in games, from offside decisions to moments of indiscipline.

Has Goal-line Technology been Successful?

(Image URL: http://worldsoccertalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/goal-line-technology.jpeg)

Given this fact, it seems obvious that goal-line technology has been a considerable success. The accuracy of goal-line decisions has improved considerably, for example, while the speed of delivery has also surprised and impressed fans from around the world. This is a key consideration, as it negated the main concern that the need to consult technology would interrupt the flow of the game.  As this has not been the case, authorities and fans are more open to the idea of utilising technology to assist referees and improve the consistency of decision making.

The latest proposals, though in their infancy, offer a different proposition. After all, goal line decisions usually need to be made after the ball has gone dead or during an impromptu break in play (following a clearance, for example).

In contrast, decisions surrounding player indiscretions or potential offside calls are often required while the ball is live, such as when a striker may be running through on goal unchallenged. In this instance, a referral to video technology must be timed impeccably and do justice to the flow of the game. Popular bookmakers like Betfair allow you to bet on the number of offsides in a game so from a bettor’s perspective only the highest level of accuracy from the officials are satisfactory.

Where Next for Video Technology?

Although this may seem like a relatively small detail, it is an important one. If widespread video technology cannot be integrated without causing significant disruption, it may damage the overall appeal of the game and its level of enjoyment. This must be factored in to any decision, as football is a quicker and more fluent game than examples such as cricket and rugby. Some may even argue that the Omnipotence of video technology creates a more staid and predictable game, which generates less talking points and interest. Given the fact that football is a professional game with increasingly high financial stakes, there is simply too much on the line for the authorities to ignore the benefits of video technology.

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